All posts by john ackers

The 2016 pre purdah Consultation Frenzy

All London local authorities are rushing out schemes before purdah. Islington and Camden schemes are shown below.

Until midnight on March 20th

Islington

Highbury Corner cyclescape  |  TfL consultation  | guidance from LCC  | Quick guidance: If you would prefer a different layout say in Q2.  However make sure you select Option 1 or Option 2 when answering Q7 so that TfL/LBI can distinguish between your response and residents who want everything to stay the same i.e. no safe cycling.

King’s Cross cyclescape  | TfL consultation |   guidance from LCC  | Camden and Islington Cyclists’s call for a radical rethink. Note that this is at concept stage, there will be another consultation about the detailed design.

North-South Cycle Superhighway  cyclescape | TfL consultation | guidance from LCC

Next door in Camden

Camden is genuinely committed to making cycling mainstream. They have far more radical proposals that need our support.

Midland Road  A great route for North Islington residents and under attack from motorists

CS11      ‘A bike lane from Portland Place to Brent Cross will be absolutely massive’  says Tom Conti in the Camden New Journal. What more can we say.

Guide to responding to CS11

Recently closed

Central London Grid   on cyclescape
Junction Road on cyclescape

Later in 2016

Bowes Park to Farringdon Quietway  – Quietway 10

“Clerkenwell Boulevard” – Clerkenwell Road and Old Street, expectations are high!

The LCC Cyclescape Consultations Map showing all cycling related consultations for London

Bath Street – the final frontier

Well after years of staff changes, funding cuts and prevarication, finally Islington Council has made Bunhill Row 2 way for cyclists. Southbound cycling is legally permitted. Please note that no residents parking places were harmed in the making of this cycle route.

After a few emails from cyclists in 2011, Bunhill ward councillors got behind the scheme, in particular councillor Councillor Claudia Webbe and things moved forward.

However we still don’t have a complete north-south route from Islington to the City. The remaining problem is Bath Street.

Looking south west at the No Entry signs at the top of Bath Street
N-S Islington to City cycle route which avoids New North Rd, Old Street roundabout and City Rd

As Islington Council officers say:

With regard to the City Rd / Bath St junction, this TfL junction is still a barrier to completing the north-south route which incorporates Sheperdess Walk, Bath St, Bunhill Row and the City of London now adding Moor St contraflow facility (south of Chiswell St).

 

TfL say:

TfL are aware that the northern end of Bath Street at the junction with City Road could be altered to improve cycle connectivity and remove the need for cyclists to travel southbound via Old Street Roundabout. A scheme to look at possible options at this location was on the 2012/13 programme, however due to resource issues I have had to put it back to next year (subject to the programme prioritisation process conducted at the start of 2013).

I am still keen to improve this area and develop a scheme that compliments the Bunhill Road two-way project. Hopefully I will be able to update you further with more positive news towards the start of 2013.

ICAG may need to push things along!

Sustrans sprinkle some magic on Drayton Park

Here’s Islington Council’s proposed second design for the Drayton Park width restriction. The original design wasn’t very popular and was thought to make the road less safe. This time around, Islington Council worked very closely with Sustrans.

Islington Council's revised design for width restriction on Drayton Park - June 2012
Cyclists now have continuous 2m wide advisory cycle lanes on the outside of the width restriction.
 
09-Jul-2012 Update from Paul Taylor at Islington Council about wider vehicles:

The motor vehicles permitted to use the bypass lanes will include:-

(a) anything done with the permission or at the direction of a police constable in uniform;

(b) in respect to a local bus service, a school bus, a coach, a vehicle being used in the service of a local authority for the collection of refuse, demolition or excavation, improvement or reconstruction of the highway, maintenance or building operation; or

(c) any vehicle being used for ambulance, fire brigade or police purposes in an emergency.

(d) those vehicles provided dispensation for access to Network Rail site from the A1 (holloway road).

Others may be provided with special dispensation on request.

I am unable to give accurate numbers for volume of these vehicles however I would estimate it to be normally less than 5 a day. However it should be noted on the occasion Drayton Park is being used as a diversionary route, it is likely all vehicles will be using the bypass lane.

For earlier information about the width restriction

May 7th: Drayton Park – the vanishing cycle bypasses.


Connect2 – proposals for Drayton Park and Gillespie Road

Echelon parking and double parking on Drayton Park - credit Pat Tuson

The width restriction on Drayton Park has raised a lot of wider issues about this cycle route. It’s also a Connect2 route chosen by Sustrans for a complete overhaul for pedestrians and cyclists.

Prompted by a comment on twitter for a ‘proper cycle lane on Drayton Park’, here is the the short list of ideas that council officers are currently working on. It’s a large file full of photos. Comments about any of the proposals are welcome.

ICAG has emphasised the need for covered cycle parking outside the Arsenal Tube station and the removal/relocation of the echelon parking close to Drayton Park station.

For quick reference, here is the short List of possible Schemes (text only). (Item 10 may refer to the whole of Drayton Park or even the whole cycle route.)

1) Gillespie Road – entrance to Tannington Terrace
Proposals:
Raise crossover to same level as footway and construct with ASP flags on reinforced concrete.
Benefits: Provides a continuous step free pedestrian walkway for increased pedestrian safety.
Estimated Construction Cost: £5000

2) Gillespie Road by Tannington Terrace
Proposals:
Install cycle stands as possible.
Housing land, will need to secure agreement with housing
Benefits: Good location for cycle stands.
Estimated Construction Cost: £5,000

3) Crossover opposite Drayton Park junction with Elfort
Road
Proposals:
Raise crossover to same level as footway and construct with ASP flags on reinforced concrete.
Benefits: Provides a continuous step free pedestrian walkway for increased pedestrian safety.
Estimated Construction Cost: £5000

4) Arsenal Stadium entrance 2 to Box Office
Proposals:
Create a raised 2 metre wide buildout in reinforced materials to match existing footways
Benefits: Large shared priority area with enhanced speed reducing features. Increases pedestrian perception of space.
No loss in parking due to presence of existing parking restrictions.
Installation of red blossom trees not costed.
Estimated Construction Cost £50,000

5) Arsenal Stadium entrance 2 to Box Office
Proposals:
Create a raised 2 metre wide buildout in reinforced materials
to match existing footways
Benefits: Large shared priority area with enhanced speed
reducing features. Increases pedestrian perception of space.
No loss in parking due to presence of existing parking restrictions.
Installation of red blossom trees not costed.
Estimated Construction Cost £50,000

6) Drayton Park – Tree Lined Verge
Proposals:
Take up and relay surfacing surrounding existing tree lined
verge with resin bonded material to prevent further tree root
damage
Benefits: Reduces trip hazards for pedestrians, increases effective available walking space, reduces unsightly cracks and water ingress to further damage the paving.
Estimated Construction Cost £125,000

7) Drayton Park / Aubert Park
Ready for Implementation
Install Pedestrian refuge in Aubert Park
Possible removal of existing roundabout after safety audits are carried out.
Estimated Construction Cost £20,000

8 ) Drayton Park junction with Whistler Street
Proposals:
Raise two crossovers to same level as footway and construct with ASP flags on reinforced concrete.
Benefits: Provides a continuous step free pedestrian walkway for increased pedestrian safety.
Cost: £12,000

9) Drayton Park mainline station
Proposals:
Construct footway buildout to same level as footway and construct with ASP flags on reinforced concrete.
Benefits: Physically narrows carriageway to help reduce vehicular speeds, Increases pedestrian space. No loss in parking due to presence of existing parking restrictions.
Cost: £30,000

10) 56 – 80 Drayton Park – realignment of cycle lanes
Proposals:
Realign cycle lanes to back of carriageway and upgrade to current LCDS.
Benefits: Facilitation of safer cycle movement, reduced conflicts with motor vehicles and increased pedestrian safety as a result of the associated new zebra crossing
Estimated Construction Cost: £65,000

11) Drayton Park – Crossover opposite mainline station
Proposals:
Raise crossover to same level as footway and construct with ASP flags on reinforced concrete.
Benefits: Provides a continuous step free pedestrian
walkway for increased pedestrian safety.
Estimated Construction Cost: £5000

12) Drayton Park / Arvon Road pedestrian crossing point /central refuge
Proposals:
Extend existing buildout and construct new central refuge and dedicated pedestrian crossing point
Benefits: Safer crossing point for pedestrians, increased perception of space and reduction in vehicle speeds.
Estimated Construction Cost £20,000

13) Arvon Road
Proposals:
Replace existing tarmac footway with ASP flags in line with current standards. Resurface carriageway.
Benefits: Increases pedestrian comfort and alleviates hazards from existing potholes where the tarmac has worn away
Estimated Construction Cost: £45,000

14) Arvon Road – Drayton Park School
Proposals:
Look into replacing unsightly guardrail with alternatives such as buildouts and trees.
Benefits: Aesthetic improvements to the environment
Estimated Construction Cost: £30,000

15) Arvon Road – Junction with Witherington Road
Proposals:
Create a raised shared space by constructing raised entry treatment in reinforced materials to match existing footways
Benefits: Continuous pedestrian crossing point, speed reduction benefits and an increased pedestrian perception of space
Estimated Construction Costs £25,000

16) Cycle symbols along entire Connect2 Route
Proposals:
Approximately 30 cycle symbols along route to define and provide directions to cyclists.
Benefits: Increase awareness of cyclists of the route.
Estimated Construction Cost: £1,500

17) Quill Street – Gillespie Park
Proposals: Build new ramped access with handrail.
Estimated Construction Cost £20,000.

18) Gillespie Park – Seven Sisters
The possibility of a ramp at the other end of the park by Seven Sisters road has been looked at by Greenspace and not deemed possible due to constraints by network rail and the level gradients being too severe. We will ensure however that the area is cleaned and tidied. Possibility of Mural or sculpture works at this end.
Estimated Construction Cost 5,000.

19) General repairs to carriageways and pavements in
Gillespie Rd, Drayton Park and St Thomas’s Road
Proposals:
Estimated Construction Cost £50,000.
Proposals:

20) Install sinusoidal humps or explore the possibilty of chicanes outside 82 and 154 Drayton Park.
Estimated Construction Cost £10,000.

Cycling is good for cities – Jan Gehl

Danish city planner - Jan Gehl

Eminent Danish city planner Jan Gehl lectured at RIBA at the end of 2011 about creating People Friendly Cities.  He’s thoughtful, engaging, funny and passionate and the large, mainly young RIBA audience loved him. Cycling isn’t just good for cyclists, it’s good for cities.

Video part 1 People friendly cities are sustainable cities. People like seeing other people. We want lively and attractive cities. Safety and security; we hate deserted places.  A good public realm and a good public transport system are brothers. 50 happy years of  cheap petroleum are over. 1/3 of Americans will die of obesity.  Not everybody can get to the escalator that leads to the fitness centre. The car invasion in the 1960s. Traffic engineers obsessed with finding capacity for cars, as if this was the only thing that mattered.

Video part 2  Walking, cycling and public spaces.

Video part 3  interrupted pavements, guardrails, pedestrian crossings with count down.What can do we for cyclists? Copenhagen, cycle lanes and buffer zones.  Advance light for cyclists on junctions. Greenwaves for cyclists. Integration between travel modes.

Video part 4 In Copenhagen, bicycling has doubled.  36% travel to work by bicycle. Number one problem in Copenhagen? congestion – in cycle lanes!  Safety in cycling numbers.  Melbourne inviting pedestrians.  New York’s Mayor Bloomberg installing many km of cycling lanes. London’s poor cycling infrastructure.

Incidentally, he told an audience in Sydney that there was only one other city in the world where pedestrians were treated as badly; London.